Posts by: Century Studios

18 Light Lily Table Lamp

18 Light Lily Table Lamp

At Century Studios, we create a full spectrum of Lily Lamps that include table lamps, floor lamps chandeliers, ceiling fixtures, and wall sconces. These unique lamps are created using a combination of cast bronze parts, hand bent tubing, and mouth blown lily shades. We recently completed an 18 Light Lily Table Lamp for a client…

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Lamp of the Week: 22″ Nasturtium

Lamp of the Week: 22″ Nasturtium

Nasturtium flowers are often referred to as the jester of the garden, a moniker that comes from the fact that the word nasturtium literally means “nose twister” or “nose tweaker”. These brightly colored ornamental plants are edible, and the flowers and leaves will add a peppery taste to salads and stir fry. The generously proportioned…

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16″ Snowball

16″ Snowball

Often mistakenly called a Hydrangea, this 16″ shade takes its inspiration from the Snowball Viburnum. While the Hydrangea has a conical shaped flower, Snowballs have round flower heads that are lime green when they first open and change to white as the flowers mature. The 16″ Snowball shade is covered in flower clusters and has…

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Lamp of the Week: 14″ Geometric w/Balls

Lamp of the Week: 14″ Geometric w/Balls

One of the reasons no one can say exactly how many lamp patterns were produced by Tiffany Studios is because the creative minds at the Studios were always looking for new and interesting variations for their shades. This 14″ Geometric w/Balls is an example of how a plain geometric shade is transformed by the addition…

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Lamp of the Week: 28″ Easter Lily

Lamp of the Week: 28″ Easter Lily

The 28″ Easter Lily shade is a Century Studios original shade design which was conceived by Bill Campbell. To bring this highly detailed pattern to life, every type of art glass was employed, including streaky, ring mottle, rippled, fibroid, drapery, and fracture/streamer. The glasses were painstakingly chosen and the colors blended to create an impressionistic…

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22″ Turtleback

22″ Turtleback

We recently completed a 22″ Turtleback shade for a client in Colorado. To create the band of three dimensional tiles, we used an unusual set of amber turtlebacks that have hints of green throughout. The geometric background was cut from an amber glass with hints of red, which gives the shade a warm, woody look….

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Lamp of the Week: 18″ Tyler

Lamp of the Week: 18″ Tyler

Commissioned by a New Jersey client in 2014, this 18″ Tyler shade has an inviting personality. The playful amber and green scrolling ribbon breaks up the green geometric background, which is deeper at the top and lightens on the lower portion of the shade. Warm amber is used at the bottom of the design for…

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Century Studios’ 1000th Shade

Century Studios’ 1000th Shade

When we opened our studio on June 1, 1986, we began keeping records of all the shades we have created. This past week, we completed our 1000th shade – a 16″ Woodbine. This pattern has a geometric background that emulates a fence or trellis shape while the colorful woodbine leaves (also known as Virginia Creeper)…

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Window of the Week: Hylas and the Nymphs

Window of the Week: Hylas and the Nymphs

Commissioned in 2001 by a local client, Hylas and the Nymphs is inspired by the 1896 painting by John William Waterhouse. The painterly color effects of shadow and light in this highly detailed window were achieved by using two and three layers of glass. The figures were hand painted by Bill Campbell using powdered minerals…

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18″ Oriental Poppy

18″ Oriental Poppy

The 18″ Oriental Poppy is an intricately detailed Tiffany Studios lamp design. Showy poppies in full bloom spill over the decorative border rows. For this shade, the flowers are rendered in striking reds with purple flower centers. The leaves are a mix of verdant greens mixed with red, orange, and blue highlights. Intermingling fracture, streaky,…

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